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Jacek Jagiello, Ph. D,
Senior Scientist,

Dr. Jacek Jagiello received his M.S. degree in chemistry from Jagiellonian University, in Krakow, Poland, with a specialty in Quantum Chemistry. He received his Doctorate in Chemistry at M. Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin, Poland in 1984, studying the thermodynamics of physical adsorption on heterogeneous surfaces, under the supervision of Prof. W. Rudzinski.

Dr. Jagiello has authored and co-authored more than 90 scientific publications, including two book chapters and more than 40 lectures presented at international conferences. He has also co-authored four U.S. patents.

In 2008, Dr. Jagiello joined Micromeritics, where he is involved in the development of methods for interpretation and modeling of adsorption measurements. His research interests are focused on adsorption properties of non-porous and porous materials - with special interest in the advancement of the understanding and characterization of activated carbons.

He began his study of the theory of physical adsorption on heterogeneous surfaces as an Assistant Professor and Research Assistant at the University of Science and Technology (AGH) in Krakow. As a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Centre National de la Recherché Scientifique (CNRS) in Mulhouse, France, he studied Inverse Gas Chromatography, participating in a group under the direction of Dr. Papirer. Later, holding a second postdoctoral position with Prof. Schwarz at Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, he worked on hydrogen and methane storage on activated carbons.

In 1996, Dr. Jagiello moved from academic to industrial research when he joined the Carbon Research Group at the Charleston Research Center of Westvaco Corporation in Charleston, South Carolina . His research projects were primarily related to the development of methods for characterization of activated carbons and to the pore structure-based modeling of carbon performance for specific applications. Later, collaborating with several international scientific groups, Dr. Jagiello contributed to research in the area of adsorption of various gases, including hydrogen, on carbon nanotubes, metal organic frameworks, and other porous materials, while he worked at Quantachrome, Boynton Beach, Florida. One year before joining Micromeritics he returned briefly to academia as a visiting scientist at The University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, where he conducted research projects in the areas of energy storage in carbon double layer capacitors and the capture of CO2 from the flue gas of coal fired power plants.